Monday, 28 July 2014

rawfest 2014

In the heatwave on gorgeous land near Tunbridge Wells.  We had a Food for Consciousness stand and several talks.


Expanding our neural horizons with biological lifestyle:

Biological diet, symbiotic relationship with fruit trees and psychotropic plants, whereby DNA read to full divine potential.  Raw alchemy is getting nutritional richness that we can assimilate in our current state whilst maintaining the lightness and pristine nature of food that will enable our neural systems to fire up.  The twist is cerebral dominance and reducing it to the point where we can bring our culture out of programming into the light of day, we can get into connection with the bioelectrical aura of the earth,  the Gaian network, coming back into feeling  and back on track of our magical evolutionary potential

True compassion is not for the unfeeling ego trips of the numbed off human species but a commitment to the dream of what humanity can become.  We are not here to pick up broken pieces but to create a new life.



Saturday, 26 July 2014

interactive magic with gaia




Bonding with Gaia-Sophia through the Gaian rite known as Cording. Presented and explained by John Lash.

cording in Andalucia

Sunday, 20 July 2014

tunuri and blue deer

This book is one of the loveliest books I have ever found for children and is  a joy for all ages. It tells a traditional childhood story with a deep message.
"The Journey of Tunuri and the Blue Deer is the story of Tunuri and his journey with Blue Deer. Tunuri, an inquistive and adventurous Huichol youth, is making a trip to the sacred mountain with the families of his village. A beautiful butterfly catches his attention, and he follows it over many hills and through the forest. Tunuri looks around and realizes that he couldn't see or hear anyone. He is lost.
Something catches Tunuri's eye, and he notices a unusual deer walking toward him which seemed to glow from inside. He knew that this deer was no ordinary animal--the coat was a lovely deep blue color! Magical Blue Deer introduces itself, and tells Tunuri that it knows where his family is. He beckons Tunuri to follow, and wherever the deer stepped, colorful flowers began to grow. Blue Deer leads Tunuri on a journey where he meets Father Sun, Brother Wind, Sister Water, Mother Earth, and Grandfather Fire. Grandfather Fire assures Tunuri that he is never truly alone, even if lost, and gives Tunuri a special task: to share all that he had learned that day with everyone he knows and meets.
The Huichol Indians are among the last of the world's indigenous cultures that have been able to maintain their way of life and spiritual traditions into this new millenium. They live in remote regions of the Sierra Madre Mountains of western Mexico, and although some communities can be reached by car, many of them are still isolated by mountainous terrain. The Huichol have a rich, nature-based spiritual tradition, and The Journey of Tunuri and the Blue Deer is a modern adaptation of one of their traditional stories. Two of the most important elements of the Huichol spiritual tradition is the sacred Blue Deer and the sacred cactus, hikuri, and this story reflects the teaching of how a boy or girl finds his or her task in life by connecting with the powers of nature through their help."

Thursday, 17 July 2014

raw high, home grown strawberries and durian meets cream

strawberries in my Somerset garden

Over the last few weeks have really enjoyed the raw high at its best again - I'm the kind of person who can easily slip into eating too much of the wrong types of food when I'm under a lot of pressure and justify a bit of this and that.  After a while it can all add up and when I go back to eating a fresher lighter diet I really notice how much happier I feel.  It's been so nice to have some time settled working at home in the beautiful summer weather with the abundance of local and not so local fruits. After 3 days (in fact almost exactly 72 hours in my case) without deviation from what I know works for me in terms of sustaining that special feeling that can come when not eating any cooked food  I feel a transformation, a lift in mood, a different feeling and perspective on life, one which I much prefer.  It's like feeling more aligned with the life force and less in the clutches of mental and cultural conditioning. Anyway, a topic to endlessly come back to.

Meanwhile what have I been eating?  Right now, although eating some salad and raw vegetable soups too, I have been mainly enjoying the lovely summer fruits, both local and tropical..raspberries, strawberries, blackcurrants, cherries (from Cheddar Gorge), mango and durian (bought frozen and thawed).  And complemented with my beloved raw dairy produce - local raw Jersey milk made into kefir and local raw Jersey cream.  I also have a few strawberries and raspberries  grown in my own little garden patch, cucumbers and tomatoes on the way.  Even to grow a small amount is a lovely fulfilling connected feeling.

kefir, mango, cherries, raw cream and vanilla powder
Breakfasts, which I eat several hours after getting up as I prefer to spend the early morning on drinks and maybe a little bee pollen, have been an adventure.  Lovely ripe mango with fresh raw cream or kefir and cherries, lucuma and vanilla powder sprinkled on.  Usually I mix noni powder and lucuma powder into the kefir as the noni complements the kefir marvellously because it opens up the pores in the intestines to allow the large tryptophan molecules in the kefir through.
kefir, mango, raw crea, cherries , vanilla and lucuma powder

Even occasionally I am having durian and cream for breakfast!   Generally durian is a fruit I generally like to eat alone intact but raw Jersey cream and durian seem to have a strange affinity to each other, at least in my taste buds and digestive system, that rich fatty but fresh feeling.  I feel euphoric afterwards and nourished for hours.  In this photo can you tell where the cream beigns and the durian ends?   See what I mean!

durian and fresh raw Jersey cream



Wednesday, 16 July 2014

strawberries and cream

kefir, raw strawberry coulis and raw cream

So traditional and yet so updated.  And so delicious. 

Of course not that long ago dairy products such as milk and cream were not pasteurised so all our cream was raw.  Traditional diets around the world have taken what is available locally and adapted it to meet our nutritional requirements now that we are away from our wild biological habitats.  In the British Isles where we do not get consistent sunshine we have had other sources for vitamin D often through dairy products.  Pasteurising or heating them reduces the vitamin D content so is slightly missing the point.  

Fruit is a very natural food for humans to eat and strawberries are great as as most berries are with low glycemic indexes (they don't spike blood sugar levels) and with lots of vitamin C and also B17 especially if blended so the seeds become nutritionally available.  Throw in some noni and we're home!  So this is my recipe:

400g strawberries
40g dried mango, soaked
1 Tbsp raw honey

Just blend together until smooth.  If you use a vitamix you can just put in the dried mango as is; with a less powerful blender you are best to soak the dried fruit first in spring water.

Here I served this delicious coulis with kefir sprinkled with lucuma powder and vanilla powder as well of course the dollop of raw cream on top.  We have our kefir delivered from Dreamers Farm.  You can see  a list of raw dairy suppliers here.

Sunday, 13 July 2014

ancient oaks on dartmoor


 Local legends associate Wistman's wood with the faerie realms and this is certainly a mystical place.    Amazing to think that once that Dartmoor and most of the British Isles were populated with trees and arboreal beings.  That we would have walked through woods from one place to another like in the fairy stories.





Saturday, 12 July 2014

the magic of barrow mump a beautiful bump




This area of Somerset is strewn with mounds which rise above the Levels, an area which until comparatively recently was under water.  The mounds formed islands rising above the lakes and these areas were inhabited a long time ago.  I love the lingering memory sense of the boat travel between the islands.  For  a year I lived in a caravan on the Levels and this impression was very vivid. The mounds intrigue me and I often look at them and wonder if they formed with or without human intervention.  Barrow Mump at Burrowbridge is a lovely place to visit, it's a quick trot to the top, almost like a miniature Glastonbury Tor and the views are beautiful.  Travelling between Somerset and Devon as I often do its a great place to stop and go barefoot and connect to the energy of the Earth and so be inspired.  The name burrow implies that that the mound was made by humans, just as a rabbit excavates its burrow.  The topsoil has been examined and found not to be local but brought from about twenty miles away.    Another magic place to enter a magical state of awareness.
Alder in Ogham tree lore is determination, discrimination

Lizzy at the top

Lizzy on the Levels