Wednesday, 8 July 2015

jaguar magic

jaguar at Na Bolom

Jaguars have special significance for the peoples of southern Mexico, you see models of them everywhere, and I have been feeling pretty inspired about jaguars too.

This article about animals using psychoactive substances describes how jaguars eat the ayahuasca vine.
According to this Discovery article, humans aren’t the only ones that use Banisteriopsis caapi (one of the two plants used to make ayahuasca) as a psychoactive. This Amazonian jungle vine contains several compounds called beta-carbolines that potentiate the DMT in the ayahuasca brew by inhibiting bodily enzymes that would otherwise be responsible for breaking down the DMT. It turns out that jaguars also seek out the leaves of this jungle vine.
Higher doses of harmala alkaloids often result in vomiting and diarrhea characteristic of ayahuasca, so one possibility is that they consume the vine to purge the intestinal tract of possible parasites; a study of the Amazonian Piaroa tribe published in theJournal of Psychoactive Drugs suggests that eating the leaves grants the jaguar heightened sensory perception, helping them hunt. However, the jaguars are also known to roll around in ecstasy after consuming the vine, suggesting to some that its use is primarily for pleasure.

You can even see a jaguar on ayahuasca here.

This article tells of  jaguar symbolism:
'The Jaguar’s medicine includes seeing the roads within chaos and understanding the patterns of chaos, moving without fear in the darkness, moving in unknown places, shape shifting, psychic vision, facilitating soul work, empowering oneself, reclaiming power.
The Black Jaguar’s medicine includes the same as jaguar but in addition keeper of the circular time continuum, gatekeeper to the unknowable.'

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